Why your website visitors are ‘going on a journey’

Paul Mayne
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Paul Mayne
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It’s likely that some folk, on reading the title of this blog post, might just shiver slightly and shake their heads in sadness. It does seem, increasingly, that everyone seems to be ‘taking journeys’. You do tend to hear this term in every talent show or cookery challenge you watch on TV. It can become quite annoying; but, in the case of the folk who visit your website, it is for once a valid description to use. Your aim, from the moment that people arrive at one of your pages, is to provide an easy and valuable journey for them to take, right through to the point where they then complete the action that you want them to.

The starting point for this journey may be controlled by you – or not. An example of the former is when individuals enter specific terms into a web search engine and this then delivers them to a specific landing page designed to clearly answer their questions, deliver the benefits they seek, and convince them to move onto the next step. For example, this might be to establish personal contact with you by calling, emailing, or using the online chat box on the page. This is a simple way in which an effective use of landing – and then subsequent – pages allows the visitor to take a simple journey through your site to where you both want them to be.

The starting points for other visits are often outside of your control. For example, visitors may arrive at your homepage after finding details elsewhere, or be directed to a specific page within your site by a social media posting from a friend. In such cases, your website design should be such that this visitor can still understand how to journey through your pages in a way that delivers the information they need and then, once again, encourages them to take the action you want – and also makes it easy for them to do so. One final point: it’s still sadly true that some company websites are effectively designed for such processes only when visited by people using desktops and laptops. The majority will now probably use tablets, smartphones and the like; so it’s vital to make sure your pages are user-friendly for visitors using all possible devices.

Paul Mayne
About the author

Paul Mayne

Paul heads up Creative Intent as Managing Director. Paul has been working in the design and marketing industry since 2003, starting off as a graphic designer before completing a Diploma in Web Design in 2005. After spending 4 years as a web designer, Paul became the general manager of a local web agency before founding Creative Intent in 2011.

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